Examples of our work

Fused Glass

Fused Glass

Fused Glass

Fused Glass

Fused Glass

Fused Glass

Acrylics on Canvas

Acrylics on Canvas

Acrylics on Canvas

Acrylics on Canvas

About

Estuary Arts was established in Golden Bay in 1987 when painter Rosie Little and partner Bruce Hamlin decided to build a gallery. It is here that they create and sell their paintings, ceramics, glass and tiles. Estuary Arts is nestled in a bush garden overlooking the Parapara estuary in Golden Bay.

Together they create an extensive range of art work in ceramic and glass, as well as acrylic and watercolour paintings. While each has specific talents, ideas freely flow between them and they collaborate on many pieces. Nature is their inspiration: the hills, mountains and tidal estuaries of Golden Bay and Nelson; flora and fauna, the sea and the human form provide design motifs for this creative couple. The gallery has been developed to be a peaceful sanctuary for Rosie and Bruce to create their works and welcome visitors.

Rosie and Bruce are likable and low key, but just watch them talk about their work, and you soon realize that while each has specific talents, sparks of creativity flash between them and every piece made at Estuary Arts contains a little of each of them.

Rosie’s 1950s rural childhood in Mahana, Nelson, allowed her the freedom to explore nature and the outdoors. “All of my artwork comes from nature and art was my only interest. I am really caught up with looking at the landscape all the time- that’s my preoccupation. My paintings are an emotional response to the landscapes I love.”

Christchurch-born Bruce not only turns his hand to the various technical aspects of Estuary Arts – making pots, ceramics, tiles and glass. He has also evolved a distinctive artistic style which reflects his love of the sea and nature. “Most of life puts us away from nature, but our life is about incorporating nature in what we are doing. I love being in the seascape and my paintings are often of big skies and water and the amazing cloud formations I see when I’m in my boat. “There is often an overlap. I might paint a watercolour and try the idea on a tile and then think that might work on a pot. Every piece is unique in itself,” Bruce says.

The couple share a healthy dose of realism, which is why they continue to explore and expand their artistic horizons and they both like to do things well. “Every day we wake up to the sea and the mountains. Our work totally reflects our environment and our life,” says Rosie.

While the summer months are busy, Rosie and Bruce enjoy a more contemplative existence during the winter months when the gallery is closed.